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Fuel Gauge Calibrator
Frequently Asked Questions

1. Do you accept PayPal?
2. Will the calibrator stop the gauge from floating up and down during acceleration, braking, turning, and etc.?
3. Will the fuel gauge calibrator work with 1991-1993 year cars?
4. Will the fuel gauge calibrator work with the Z-28 cluster mod?
5. Does the calibrator fix a fuel gauge that does not go below 1/4 full?
6. So does it just ground more to the frame to increase the resistance I suppose?
7. How does empty usually work out? Will my gas warning light work again?
8. Why does the SuperStore fix kit have that big box when this kit has just the 2 wires? Do they both work the same way?
9. After the install, without turning the little screw, the needle is right on the full mark. Is it possible that I don't have to adjust it at all?


Do you accept PayPal?

Yes, I accept PayPal, check, or money order. Use my e-mail address (bradley@fuelgaugecalibrator.com) for PayPal payments.
Note: You can pay with cash if we happen to run into eachother at an event. You will also save the $5 S&H fee.

Will the calibrator stop the gauge from floating up and down during acceleration, braking, turning, and etc.?

No, my fuel gauge calibrator (or any other calibrator) won't fix a gauge that bounces during acceleration and turning. What you described is the classic tell-tale sign of a completely bad sending unit. The sending unit is beyond calibration help and needs to be replaced.

Will the fuel gauge calibrator work with 1991-1993 year cars?

Yes, the calibrator will work with 1991-1993 year cars.

Will the fuel gauge calibrator work with the Z-28 cluster mod?

My calibrator will work with the Z-28 cluster mod. Remember that it's not the cluster that is being corrected, it's the fuel level sending unit in the gas tank. If your Z-28 gauge reads past the "F" when full, the calibrator will definitely adjust it down to the "F", where it's supposed to be.

Does the calibrator fix a fuel gauge that does not go below 1/4 full?

It's possible that my kit will correct this issue, but unlikely. In the past it has fixed certain gauges with this same problem. Chances are much higher, though, that the sending unit in the gas tank is bad and beyond calibration help.
There are two possible solutions: replace the sending unit or service your existing sending unit.
You could try the calibrator, but I can not guarantee that your gauge will be one of the few that it worked on. My kit is more specifically focused on the "Full" end of the gauge, although 99% of the time it also automatically makes the bottom end behave more appropriately.

So does it just ground more to the frame to increase the resistance I suppose?

The resistor is installed in parallel and actually DECREASES the resistance the gauge sees. That's the effect of parallel resistance. The sender when new is supposed to be 90 ohms. Over time that resistance increases to 120-150 ohms. The calibrator simply brings it back into range.

How does empty usually work out? Will my gas warning light work again?

GM fuel sending units are designed to indicate the fuel level using a resistive signal. When new, the range of the resistive signal is between 0-90 ohms. Zero ohms correlates to "empty" and 90 ohms correlates to "full".
The low fuel light is energized when the sending unit provides a 10 ohm signal to the fuel gauge. Depending on how bad the sending unit is, it may not be able to send a 10 ohm signal. Typically, the sending unit potentiometer in the fuel tank goes bad because it gets gummed up with fuel deposits. The fuel deposits make the resistance higher throughout the range and the gauge "thinks" that the tank is more full than it actually is. My calibrator may re-activate the low fuel light feature, but it is not specifically guaranteed to make it work again.
Note: Don't let your tank get too low on gas. That's how the fuel pump gets cooled. Less gas equals less cooling which means shorter pump life.

Why does the SuperStore fix kit have that big box when this kit has just the 2 wires? Do they both work the same way?

My kit is a trimpot resistor that dials in the fuel sender to be calibrated the way it was from the factory. You see, from the factory the fuel gauge sender is 90 ohms when full. Over time the sender "weakens" and reads 120-150 ohms when full. So by installing my calibrator kit in parallel with your fuel gauge sender, you are able to bring that resistance back down to the 90 ohms it's supposed to be. My kit is considered a "passive" kit since it is a one shot deal and only specifically calibrates the full end of the gauge. Typically the low end behaves like it's supposed to once my kit is installed. Now the SuperStore kit is an "active" calibrator and is theoretically capable of adjusting the low end also. In theory the SuperStore calibrator "actively" adjusts itself to correct the fuel gauge throughout the entire range, that's why it needs a power connection and that's why it has two trim dials on it.
My point here is that both kits essentially accomplish the same end result, but my kit is significantly easier to install and much less expensive. I make these kits so people in our club can have an affordable and simple fix to their fuel gauge woes.
NOTE: My kit will not fix a sending unit that is completely bad. You know yours is bad if the needle bounces around A LOT. You need a new sending unit and no kit will fix it. My kit is for those needles that go way past the "F" and take forever to move and when they get to 1/2 tank they seem to drop like a rock.

After the install, without turning the little screw, the needle is right on the full mark. Is it possible that I don't have to adjust it at all?

It is possible that you don't have to adjust it. After I manufacture each and every calibrator I test them individually and pre-adjust them to a reasonably close/average value (500 ohms) for most cars to minimize the amount of calibration you have to do. I used to set them up so that they were so far backed out of the calibration (1,000 ohms) that it took about 9 full turns before the calibrator moved the gauge needle. I got so many e-mails asking about it that I decided to pre-calibrate them. Now every calibrator that I mail out is pre-calibrated and I don't get any more of the "false alarm" e-mails.

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